MOLLUSCUM CONTAGIOSUM

The condition spreads through contact with an infected person or a contaminated object.
Though painless, the small bumps might itch. Scratched bumps can spread infection to surrounding skin.

Molluscum contagiosum can affect anyone of any age. It is most common in children, and mostly happens in children aged 1-4. However, it can also affect adults.

The small lumps on the skin (the mollusca) usually develop 2-7 weeks after you become infected with the virus. Typically, each molluscum lasts about 6-12 weeks, crusts over, and then goes. However, new ones tend to appear as old ones are going, as the virus spreads to other areas of skin. Therefore, crops of mollusca may appear to come and go for several months.

To reduce the chance of passing it on to others, it is sensible not to share towels, clothes, soft toys, or bathwater if you have molluscum contagiosum. Also, try to avoid skin-to-skin contact with other people (for example, by covering affected areas with clothing). For adults who have mollusca, a condom should be used during sex. This will not completely stop skin-to-skin spread but will reduce the chance of passing it on considerably.

Try not to scratch the mollusca, as this may increase the risk of spreading the rash to other areas of the skin. Molluscum contagiosum can be passed on to other people (is contagious) until the last molluscum has gone.

It is advisable to visit a Dermatologist for treatment and also to check for any underlying immune problem if any.Visit our clinics at Malad,Juhu and Bandra in Mumbai for all skin,hair and nail ailments.Call 9004839333 for appointments.

CHICKENPOX

An itchy rash is the most common symptom of chickenpox. The infection will have to be in your body for around seven to 21 days before the rash and other symptoms develop. You start to be contagious to those around you up to 48 hours before the skin rash starts to occur.

The non-rash symptoms may last a few days and include:

  • Fever
  • Headache
  • Loss of appetite

One or two days after you experience these symptoms, the classic rash will begin to develop. The rash goes through three phases before you recover. These include:

  • You develop red or pink bumps all over your body.
  • The bumps become blisters filled with fluid that leaks.
  • The bumps become crusty, scab over, and begin to heal.

The bumps on your body will not all be in the same phase at the same time. New bumps will continuously appear throughout your infection. The rash may be very itchy, especially before it scabs over with a crust.You are still contagious until all the blisters on your body have scabbed over. The crusty scabbed areas eventually fall off.

Visit our clinics at Malad,Juhu and Bandra in Mumbai for all skin,hair and nail ailments.Call 9004839333 for appointments.

TYPES OF MOLES

Not all moles are created equal. Here’s a quick guide to mole types and what they mean for our skin. It’s good to note that moles are categorized by multiple factors, including when they developed, where they are located in the skin and if they exhibit typical or atypical symptoms. That means moles are often described by multiple classifications. For instance, you can have a common acquired junctional nevus or an atypical congenital nevus.

Common

A common mole is one that is usually about 5-6 mm in diameter, has distinct edges, a smooth, dome-like surface and even pigmentation. These moles are usually found on skin regularly exposed to the sun and have the potential to turn into skin cancer, but it is a rare occurrence.

Atypical

Atypical moles, or dysplastic nevi, are moles that exhibit irregular symptoms. They usually have fuzzy or blurry borders, are varied in color, larger than most moles and have both flat and raised components. While dysplastic nevi share a lot of the same signs of pre-cancerous or cancerous moles, most dysplastic nevi are benign. However, a person with many dysplastic nevi is at an increased risk for skin cancer. The more dysplastic nevi a person has, the higher the risk. Regular self-examinations are important to detect changes in these types of moles.

Mole types by time

Congenital

Congenital moles, also known as congenital nevi, are moles that are present at birth. They are caused by melanocyte cells in the dermis (middle layer of skin), epidermis (outer layer of skin), or both. These types of moles can range in size and are sometimes referred to as birthmarks. Congenital nevi can be at risk of developing into melanoma later in life and should be monitored as you enter adolescence and adulthood.

Acquired

Acquired moles are moles that appear during childhood and adulthood. Most of these moles are benign and pose no risk, although sometimes they can turn into cancerous moles with age. This is the most common type of mole, and it is usually caused by repeated sun exposure.

Mole types by location

Junctional Melanocytic Nevi

Junctional melanocytic nevi are moles that occur from an accumulation of melanocytes where the dermis and epidermis meet. These moles are typically slightly raised with regular borders and dark pigmentation, although they can range in color from tan to dark brown. People normally acquire these moles in childhood to early adulthood, because, as we age, it is common for melanocytes to migrate down to deeper layers of the skin.

Intradermal Nevi

Intradermal nevi are flesh colored moles that often blend in with your surrounding skin. Their pigmentation is not as dark as junctional melanocytic nevi because they are located in the dermis, or the middle layer of your skin. These moles usually develop in late childhood or throughout adulthood and are very common and usually benign.

Compound Nevi

Compound nevi show signs of both intradermal and junctional nevi, with melanocyte cells located in the dermis and dermo-epidermis junction. These moles usually have a central raised area with flat areas around the edges. They usually have distinct borders and even pigmentation.

Other mole types to note

Halo Nevi

Halo nevi are raised moles that have a ring of skin around them that has lost pigmentation due to inflammatory infiltrating cells.Visit  our clinics at Malad,Juhu and Bandra in Mumbai for all skin,hair and nail ailments.Call 9004839333 for appointments.

DO’S FOR LONG AND HEALTHY HAIR

Tips for long and healthy hair:

1.Trim your hair regularly

2.Deep conditioning with hot oil massages.

3.Drink plenty of water.

4.Brush your hair regularly

5.Avoid blow dry.

6.Space out hair washes.

7.Sleep well to maintain healthy hair.

8.Say no to stress to avoid hair fall

9.Eat healthy protein rich food.

For all skin,hair and nail ailments call 9004839333.Our clinics are located at Malad,Juhu and Bandra in Mumbai.

SCABIES

Scabies is a skin condition caused by an infestation of the human itch mite called Sarcoptes scabiei. These microscopic mites burrow into the skin and cause symptoms of itching and rash.

Anyone can get scabies. It is found all over the world and the mite is transmitted by direct and prolonged skin-to-skin contact with a person who has scabies. Sexual contact is the most common way scabies is transmitted. Transmission can also happen from parents to children, particularly mother-to-infant. The mite can only survive about 48 to 72 hours without human contact, so it is uncommon, though possible, for scabies to spread through infested bedding or furniture. Scabies mites can only live about 72 hours without human contact, but once on a person, the mites can live up to two months. Mites survive longer in colder conditions with higher humidity. Once on a person, mites can burrow into the skin, and symptoms usually begin three to six weeks after infestation.

Symptoms of scabies are usually itching (which tends to be more intense at night), and a pimple-like rash. Scabies rash can appear on any part of the body, but the most common sites are wrists, elbows, armpits, the skin between the fingers and toes and around the nails, and skin usually covered by clothing such as the buttocks, belt line, nipples, and penis. Infants and young children may have scabies rash on their head, face, neck, palms, and soles.

In some patients with weakened immune systems, scabies rash may become crusted.For  treatment and appointments call 9004839333.Clinics at Malad,Juhu and Bandra in Mumbai.

 

PIGMENTATION

Normal skin contains cells called melanocytes. These cells produce Melanin, the substance that gives skin its color.

Skin with too much melanin is called hyperpigmented skin.

Skin with too little melanin is called hypopigmented skin.

Pale skin areas are due to too little melanin or underactive melanocytes. Darker areas of skin (or an area that tans more easily) occurs when you have more melanin or overactive melanocytes.

Bronzing of the skin may sometimes be mistaken for a suntan. This skin discoloration often develops slowly, starting at the elbows, knuckles, and knees and spreading from there. Bronzing may also be seen on the soles of the feet and the palms of the hands. The bronze color can range from light to dark (in fair-skinned people) with the degree of darkness due to the underlying cause.

Causes

Causes of hyperpigmentation include:

  • Skin inflammation (post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation)
  • Use of certain drugs (such as minocycline and birth control pills)
  • Endocrine diseases such as Addison diseases
  • Hemochromatosis (iron overload)
  • Sun exposure
  • Pregnancy

Causes of hypopigmentation include:

  • Skin inflammation
  • Certain fungal infections (such as tinea versicolor)
  • Pityriasis alba
  • Vitiligo
  • Certain medicines
  • Skin condition called idiopathic guttate hyomelanosis

For appointments call 9004839333 at our clinics at Malad,Juhu and Bandra    in Mumbai  for all skin,hair and nail ailments.

FACTS ABOUT HAIR

It’s the perennial question of the hair it is a fact that cutting back is a good thing – and washing every day is a mistake, no matter how much you might crave clean-feeling locks.Your hair’s natural oils are designed to condition and protect your tresses, so when you shampoo daily, it strips these vital oils away.It creates a vicious cycle of over-production of oils and a need to shampoo very often. Ideally, to keep your hair healthy, you only need to wash two to three times a week, max.
Don’t overwash coloured hair
This is especially true for coloured hair, which can lose its sheen quickly with too much washing.The biggest mistake people make is over-washing coloured hair.Buy a good-quality shampoo– and wash it every few days using styling products in between to keep it looking fresh.Don’t shampoo daily. Simply rinse and condition the hair every other day as shampoo can wash out the colour.
Take into account your hair type and lifestyle choices
Of course, how often you need to wash your locks also depends on the type of hair you have.You may not be able to imagine not washing your hair after a workout ,you can can always rinse out sweat without shampooing.A water-only rinse will remove salt and sweat without stripping hair oils.
Invest in some good dry shampoo
And finally if you’re aiming to scale back the amount of times you wash your hair per week, remember dry shampoo is your friend.Use dry shampoo instead of washing your hair every day. It will help reduce the oil build up in your hair and gives amazing texture You can also leave dry shampoo in (instead of brushing it out) to give volume.As opposed to washing your hair every day, dry shampoo will help to refresh your hair at the roots and the tips whilst helping you to retain all the essential moisture your hair needs.Avoid hot showers and shampoo your scalp, not your ends.
Amount of Shampoo
Come shampoo time, many of us reach for a large dollop of the good stuff to scrunch into our hair; but there’s a technique to good hair washing and overdoing things on the product front will do more harm than good.Healthy, beautiful, shiny hair starts in the shower so make sure to use the right shampoo and conditioner for your hair type and level of damage. The volume of shampoo you should use depends on the length and thickness of your hair, but a blob the size of a small 1 rupee coin is a good start.Longer hair needs a 2 rupee coin.
Aim for the scalp not the ends
It’s not just how much shampoo you use, but where you apply it that counts.Use shampoo on the scalp only – not on the ends of your hair. The shampoo will rinse down in the shower, but you don’t want to scrub the ends.
Massage your scalp to encourage circulation
Giving your head an invigorating massage as you shampoo is a good way to encourage blood circulation and helps to detoxify the scalp.Having strong, healthy hair is the best way to make any hair look expensive. A lot of it is about properly shampooing and conditioning and taking care of your scalp – massage it well while washing to get circulation going.
Avoid hot water
Cool off in the shower. Blasting your scalp with extremely hot water will dry out your hair and create tangles that could result in breakage.Towel-dry your hair before applying conditioner.
What conditioner you use and how you use it is
 If anything, more important than the shampoo stage. Make sure you invest in a few good quality conditioners and leave-in treatments or hair masks, especially if you have coloured hair.
Good conditioner is also crucial when it comes to thick, curly hair.
For curly, highly textured hair, always deep condition .No two minute conditioners here. Deep conditioning involves a conditioner that will add moisture and strength (protein) back to hair. I believe it’s important to use leave-in conditioners and also not to shampoo it so often. Rinse it if you want to but don’t necessarily shampoo it.
Gently towel-dry the hair before applying conditioner
Make sure you towel-dry hair after shampooing and before you apply conditioner: excess water in your hair means the conditioner won’t be able to penetrate the hair shaft and deliver the necessary moisture to keep hair looking healthy and shiny.If you’re short on time, at least squeeze out excess water – hair that’s saturated with water doesn’t have room to absorb anything else.
Avoid the roots and concentrate on the ends
Try not to put the conditioner on the roots, because that can cause your scalp to get greasy faster.It’s also a good idea to think ahead and anticipate situations where your hair might dry out.While you exercise, you perspire, which means that your hair gets damp with sweat that can actually make it dry.Before you hit the gym (especially during the summer, but this works year-round too) wet your hair and add in some conditioner from the mid-lengths to the ends. Rinse out the conditioner post-workout and you’ll be left with shiny, hydrated hair.Avoiding too much sun helps too.Brush your hair twice a day, from the bottom up
Comb wet hair, don’t brush it
When your hair is soaking wet, it is weaker, fragile and more susceptible to breakage.Try not to rough-dry hair with a towel, and instead gently press the water out. Also, do not brush your hair while it is wet. Use a wide-tooth comb, working from the ends of your hair on up.
Brush from the bottom up
Brushing from the roots causes damage – always brush from the bottom and work up
Use different brushes for blow-dying and styling
At home, you should have a round brush for blow-drying, for styling and a tail comb to move hair around a little
Keep your brushes clean
Filthy hair brushes that are covered in hair, oil and product build-up are breeding grounds for bacteria. Clean them at least once a month with a mixture of baking soda and lukewarm water. A toothbrush will help you to get into all those tiny bristles.
For more information and queries call 9004839333.Clinics at Malad,Juhu and Bandra in Mumbai.